Published: Tue, June 20, 2017
Global Media | By Meredith Barber

79 missing or presumed dead in the Grenfell Tower fire

79 missing or presumed dead in the Grenfell Tower fire

London police said 79 people are now believed to have died in the fire that swept through a high-rise apartment building last week, making it the deadliest blaze in recent British history.

The rest are missing presumed dead and Mr Cundy said "the bad reality is that we may not be able to identify all those that died" inside what is now a blackened and charred shell.

Officers had earlier warned that some may never be identified due to the condition of their remains.

Detectives investigating the fire at Grenfell Tower in London say new footage of the gutted building's burned-out interior shows just how hard the task of finding and identifying bodies is proving to be.

"I can not imagine the distress and suffering that not knowing what has happened to your loved one is causing and I completely understand the desire for answers that families, those for whom Grenfell Tower was home and the local community have".

"It will also be a subject that the criminal investigation will be looking at", he said. "Wherever we can, we will bring people to justice if there is evidence".

"If I identify.an issue that is a risk to public safety, we will be sharing that immediately with the relevant authorities", he added.

Of that 79, police have identified five people.

There are fears there may have been people in the building who may not have been reported to the police.

Members of emergency services work inside the burnt out remains of the Grenfell Tower in North Kensington London
Members of emergency services work inside the burnt out remains of the Grenfell Tower in North Kensington London

London mayor Sadiq Khan has said that tower blocks in the city built during the 1960s and 1970s could be torn down following the Grenfell Tower fire.

The silence was also observed at Government buildings across the country.

He said: "We must also prepare people for the awful reality that some people may not be identified due to the intensity of the fire".

Search and recovery crews have been working in the tower since last Wednesday's fire.

"Until we do that, we can not look at anything other than staying with the same advice".

Prime Minister Theresa May was to chair another meeting of top officials in response to the tragedy.

London police late Sunday released photographs of the devastation inside the 120-unit building to show the public and frustrated family members why the search for victims is taking so long.

He told BBC Radio 4's The World at One: "I feel like everybody else traumatised by the enormity of the tragedy that overtook North Kensington in the early hours of Wednesday morning".

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