Published: Sun, August 13, 2017
Research | By Jo Caldwell

Solar Eclipse and Ham Radio article online

Solar Eclipse and Ham Radio article online

According to NASA, a solar eclipse occurs when the moon moves in front of the sun, creating a barrier between earth and the sun. Be sure to look down in the shade of a tree during the eclipse.

Big events also mean big opportunities for scammers and unscrupulous businesses.

Science Central's event Sunday will show people how to experience the solar eclipse safely during hands-on activities and demonstrations, the science center said on its website, www.sciencecentral.org. Here are some things to be wary of while you get ready for the eclipse.

Safety first! - Be certain to guide your children, and NEVER look at the sun without approved filters, even when the sun is nearly completely eclipsed. He said the glasses are darker than sunglasses and provide the needed eye protection.

And in the, please don't even consider an app like for a moment - Solar Eclipse glasses (99 cents) says it is handy when stores have run out of solar glasses.

NASA has anticipated Americans would have many questions, so the federal space agency got a bunch of its scientists together this week for an AskMeAnything on Reddit to allow people to fire away.

"It's so risky for people to look at the sun even for brief periods of time because you can cause permanent damage to the retina - we call it solar retinopathy and it's really very close to burning a hole in the retina". Don't deal with anyone who asks for payment outside of the platform's approved options. Almost every hotel room in the eclipse path is booked, which is expected to contribute to heavy - and possibly distracted - traffic on Interstate 5 and other highways throughout the morning.

This event is free and open to the public. These tips can be found at BBB.org.

Traffic will likely be heavy on any road between a major city and the eclipse path. And to give you an idea how smart scientists are, they call this the Diamond Ring Effect. And how's the weather looking for my desired viewing location?

The earth averages two to three eclipses each year, but a total eclipse happening in any given area is extremely rare. Do not forget to do your research, and always trust your instincts - if something seems too good to be true, it probably is.

The USA TODAY Network will be covering the eclipse in full force on August 21, from OR through SC, so stick with us for the latest.

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